Top 6 big foodie trends for 2010

What culinary trends will hit the region's restaurants next?
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FOOD & BEVERAGE, Top 10, Chefs, Duncan Cruickshanks, Food, Made Darmagunawn, Sam Leong, Thomas Gerasch, Uwe Micheel, Vineet Bhatia
FOOD & BEVERAGE, Top 10, Chefs, Duncan Cruickshanks, Food, Made Darmagunawn, Sam Leong, Thomas Gerasch, Uwe Micheel, Vineet Bhatia
FOOD & BEVERAGE, Top 10, Chefs, Duncan Cruickshanks, Food, Made Darmagunawn, Sam Leong, Thomas Gerasch, Uwe Micheel, Vineet Bhatia
FOOD & BEVERAGE, Top 10, Chefs, Duncan Cruickshanks, Food, Made Darmagunawn, Sam Leong, Thomas Gerasch, Uwe Micheel, Vineet Bhatia
FOOD & BEVERAGE, Top 10, Chefs, Duncan Cruickshanks, Food, Made Darmagunawn, Sam Leong, Thomas Gerasch, Uwe Micheel, Vineet Bhatia
FOOD & BEVERAGE, Top 10, Chefs, Duncan Cruickshanks, Food, Made Darmagunawn, Sam Leong, Thomas Gerasch, Uwe Micheel, Vineet Bhatia
FOOD & BEVERAGE, Top 10, Chefs, Duncan Cruickshanks, Food, Made Darmagunawn, Sam Leong, Thomas Gerasch, Uwe Micheel, Vineet Bhatia

Over the past decade, the Middle East’s culinary scene has been influenced by scores of international trends, resulting in a huge selection of restaurants catering to every taste imaginable.

But what will be the next big trend to impact the F&B scene — nouvelle, healthy, molecular, homely?

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Some of the region’s top chefs share their predictions for the foodie future…


“I would say very much ‘back to basics’.

“This implies quality ingredients and a major focus on good taste; and most of all, it’s back to reasonable and fair portions at reasonable prices — a bit more value for money.

“What I also see fading away is molecular cooking; things are going back to very natural, seasonal products with much more simplified dishes, ones you would usually get in a bistro.

“Like one of my favourite sayings in life: less is more!”

Uwe Micheel
Director of kitchens at Radisson Blu Hotel Dubai Deira Creek and president of the Emirates Culinary Guild

“Healthy and organic food will become more and more popular, since today’s consumers are becoming steadily more health-conscious.”

I. Made Darmagunawn
Head chef, Sezzam, Kempinski Hotel Mall of the Emirates

“We feel, with the industry evolving, the emphasis is becoming more about using good quality products simply, to keep their natural balance.

“So I would say we’ll see increased use of good quality products cooked well and simply presented.”

Duncan Cruickshanks
Head chef, Rivington Grill, Souk Al Bahar

“I think in addition for quality, people will look for more value; the recession has taught us you just cannot operate like you did a few years back.

“Guests today are very sensitive and very knowledgeable: either you have something phenomenally good that is worth a high price, or you have to assess and make sure the offering is good value.

“I also think that Japanese cuisine has been on a real high here, but I think that is slowing and we might see a new favoured theme coming through — perhaps Spanish. There is definitely a move towards that light, sharing style.”

Vineet Bhatia
Patron chef, Indego, Grosvenor House Dubai

“I think customers are coming back to comfort food, even when dining out.

“They’re looking for something special once in a while, but ultimately they’re looking for comfort food: things they like and know and will go back to time and time again.”

Sam Leong
Director of kitchens, Tung Lok Restaurants

“We’re trying to work more with local products, because that really helps ensure the quality and freshness of the produce.

“I believe there are some farming concepts coming up now looking at supplying hotels in this region, so that would be amazing if it takes off.

“In the long run, I’d very much like to see more fresh produce coming out of this region.”

Thomas Gerasch
Executive chef, Cove Rotana Resort, Ras Al Khaimah

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